August 5 – Rattle River

Today as we wound our way down the Rattle River the kids were engrossed in a make-believe of their own creation. Jack Frost had stolen the enchanted crystal from Orie the Outdoors Fairy, and if Cartwheel and RobinHood couldn’t get it back, no one would ever love the outdoors again. They had wands made by braiding grass strands over knobbly twigs and they raced down the trail living their own action adventure.

This meant we made great time and the parents went for a swim in the chilly Rattle River. The kids turned down the opportunity not wanting to take a break from their drama. Shortly there after, we met up with Bill Plouffe, a colleague and mentor of All In’s, who came out to hike for the day. He’s previously hike all of New England’s four thousand footers and can name most of the mountains in the Whites on sight. We enjoyed the walk down the river and a lunch in town. Then we headed back to the trailhead to head up into the Mahoosic Range.

Back in Franconia Notch the kids elected to send their packs home with their grandparents for the week we went through the Whites. They’ve enjoyed scrambling over rocks packless as their parents carry all the gear. With all the food we could get at the huts, our packs haven’t really been much heavier. We sent the hammocks home as well and our back to one family tent. After we pass through Mahoosic Notch later this week, we’re headed home for a few days for a memorial service for Mama Bear’s uncle. When we return, the kids will have their packs back.

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5 Comments on “August 5 – Rattle River

  1. Ummmmm think you meant to say “…hiked all of New England’s FOUR-thousand footers…” Not quite the same as Colorado’s fourteeners, but as/more scenic in their own special way.

    Very much enjoying reading your family adventures and reflections along the trail. I think you have the material for a companion volume to Bryson….

  2. I thought you meant all fourteenof new england’s one-thousand footers;

  3. Indeed you should write a book David, and what a fine one it would be. Better than Bryson’s.. after all, he didn’t finish did he? Nor take two children and a dog?
    Wired has finished her walk now and her triple crown, what an achievement for her..

  4. Your kids have quite the imagination…love it!! And a book about your adventures would be awesome.

  5. I knew exactly what you meant about the 4,000 foot or taller mountains in New England. My sister had a goal of accomplishing the summits of all the four-thousand footers in N.E. and was well on her way when she was killed in a car accident in 1992 at age 46. She was an AMC member and a huge lover of the wild. I never understood her desire for the wilderness but after her death I acquired some of her ashes and began a quest of finishing her 4,000 footers. The first one, Old Speck, nearly killed me and if the day hadn’t been overcast so I couldn’t see the elevation before me, I never would have finished it. I was told that there were only 10-12 of the 4,000 footers that were left to be done and while I really didn’t enjoy the climb I decided that I would grit my teeth and finish them as a memorial for my dear sister, Sue.

    Well, that began a new love for me. My husband and I invested in some gear and began, at 50ish to become hikers and backpackers. I never finished all of the 4,000 footers but we have done most of the AT in Maine and loved it. I fell in love with being out on the trail and wish I had tried it with Sue. One learns so much about themselves, what is really important in life, and their Creator on the trail. I am so blessed when we read your family adventures. What a wonderful gift your are giving to your children!

    We are looking forward to your posting about the Mahoosics.

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